The architect's partner must endure

Being an architect’s partner is not an easy road.  Architects are trained to question societal conventions in a quest for new ideas to enrich their designs.  When this quest begins at home, it can create undue pressure on their spousal relationship.

 Often, when an architect experiments with new ideas they first try it in their own homes.  These experiments can cause strain between the architect and their spouse.

 

In a non-architect household, convention, style and media dictate the primary set up.  Modest trends slowly change the landscape of household.  Couples don’t often experience serious disagreement in the way their living space is arranged.  Generally one acquiesces to the other as long as there are no radical deviations from the norm.

 

However, in the household of an architect, one of their experiments in the living space for the architect can turn into an unresolved disagreement, which can escalate into a full-blown conflict.  An architect’s marital bliss (or lack thereof) can be determined by how conflicts over the choice of furniture, paint colors, light fixtures and other details in and around the love nest are resolved.

Yuri’s visit

My grandchildren usually come to stay with us during their annual spring break and I was showing them the wonders of architecture via a picture book of modern designed buildings.  My 9 year old grandson, Yuri, spotted a tower, among the photos, that was accessible by a stair which made an easy climb to the top.   He said to me “Grandpa, we should build a tower in your back yard.”  Not taking the comment of a 9 year old too seriously, I expected him to quickly forget what he said.

 Over the winter and in my daydreams, Yuri’s idea came to mind and I began drawing a tower structure that could become a central feature in our back yard.  I showed my wife the tower design and she placated me, not thinking I was actually serious about turning such a daydream into reality.  It would be idiotic to actually implement an idea like this, she thought.

The next time when Yuri came for a visit, the first thing he asked me was “when are we going to build the tower?”  I showed him the drawings and model I’d built over the winter and he said  “let’s get started!”  His father, my son Robert, offered to come for a week’s visit and help build the tower.  So the decision was made to actually build the thing.   When the construction began, my wife expressed that she wasn’t happy to have such a monstrosity in our back yard.  But, as she had agreed to it, she reluctantly got on board.  And, since the project would bring her boys, my grandson, my son and I together for a week, it had it’s benefits. The tower didn’t get finished during that week, however we got a great start.   All summer long I worked continued to work on the tower as it rose above the rooftops.  It became the talk of the town.  Everyone came to our yard to view this ‘unusual new structure’ in the neighborhood asking why and many other questions.  Most felt it was an interesting and welcome addition to our community.   One day my wife was out visiting some friends and they asked what her husband was up to. She said “he’s building some idiotic tower.”  And this is how it became known as the IDIOTIC TOWER.  To this day, this ‘idiotic tower’ is a magnet that brings friends, neighbors and complete strangers into our yard to view and climb to the top.  My wife is a social person and enjoys these unannounced visitors, but she still feels the tower is ‘idiotic.’   I got my tower, in the end, but sometimes the architect doesn’t always win in these spousal debates.   Stay tuned for a story about an argument I didn’t win “the game breaker.”   Phone: 780 490 8831 Email: norbert@architectureplusbusiness.com Website: architectureplusbusiness.com Twitter: @archplusbis Blog: Architecture+Business Blog Author:  The E-Myth Architect    Why Most Small Architectural Firms Don't Work and What To Do About    

The next time when Yuri came for a visit, the first thing he asked me was “when are we going to build the tower?”  I showed him the drawings and model I’d built over the winter and he said  “let’s get started!”  His father, my son Robert, offered to come for a week’s visit and help build the tower.  So the decision was made to actually build the thing.

 

When the construction began, my wife expressed that she wasn’t happy to have such a monstrosity in our back yard.  But, as she had agreed to it, she reluctantly got on board.  And, since the project would bring her boys, my grandson, my son and I together for a week, it had it’s benefits. The tower didn’t get finished during that week, however we got a great start.

 

All summer long I worked continued to work on the tower as it rose above the rooftops.  It became the talk of the town.  Everyone came to our yard to view this ‘unusual new structure’ in the neighborhood asking why and many other questions.  Most felt it was an interesting and welcome addition to our community.

 

One day my wife was out visiting some friends and they asked what her husband was up to. She said “he’s building some idiotic tower.”  And this is how it became known as the IDIOTIC TOWER.  To this day, this ‘idiotic tower’ is a magnet that brings friends, neighbors and complete strangers into our yard to view and climb to the top.  My wife is a social person and enjoys these unannounced visitors, but she still feels the tower is ‘idiotic.’

 

I got my tower, in the end, but sometimes the architect doesn’t always win in these spousal debates.   Stay tuned for a story about an argument I didn’t win “the game breaker.”

 

Phone: 780 490 8831

Email: norbert@architectureplusbusiness.com

Website: architectureplusbusiness.com

Twitter: @archplusbis

Blog: Architecture+Business Blog

Author:  The E-Myth Architect   

Why Most Small Architectural Firms Don't Work and What To Do About